history, Moral Reasoning, Public opinion

Don’t Ask Questions: When Curiosity is a Crime

While curiosity may have killed the cat, it has no doubt saved the arse of humanity on many occasions. Wondering, imagining and being curious are part of what it means to be a human being.

C'mon people, we've got to do better (and lies won't help)

C’mon people, we’ve got to do better (and lies won’t help)

What if you were curious about a thing, but it was against the law to ask any questions? Then you would either be quiet, look into it covertly or stand up bravely and publicly, ask your question-and go directly to jail.

In many European countries and Canada, it is against the law to question any detail of the holocaust narrative. It is against the law to question the number “6,000,000” to introduce hard contrary evidence or even to point out where official sources have revised details. To do so is holocaust denial, you must be a Nazi, you will go to jail and your life will be ruined.

I think this is both bizarre and wrong. Let people ask-if truth is on your side, just answer them, don’t jail them. Why would you be so afraid of investigation into this one event? It is interesting that the exact same sequence of nonsense is occurring with the genocide in Rwanda.

The official story is that about one million people, mostly of the Tutsi tribe, were slaughtered by the Hutus over a period of three months in 1994. Now this story is being challenged by the BBC, which asserts there weren’t more than 500,000 Tutsis in Rwanda to start with and at the end, there were still 300,000 there.

(Note: I oppose killing human beings on principle. These stories make me shudder-whatever the truth is, its bad enough-but I say truth is better than lies, and I also say that on principle.)

If the BBC is right, it was more of a bloody and horrible Civil War, a tragedy to be sure. The outside world got its information mostly from mainstream press (how reliable is that?!) and from the movie Hotel Rwanda (how reliable is that!?) And guess what? It is against the law in Rwanda to question any aspect of the Rwandan genocide-in fact you can go to jail unless you call it the Tutsi Genocide!

When curiosity, when asking questions about past events- is against the law, know this- you have bumped up against history serving politics.

 

 

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About Je' Czaja

Je' is a writer, artist, and stand up philosopher. She founded and directed two non-profit organizations for disadvantaged children and their families, served as a missionary for three years and is the author of several books. https://www.smashwords.com/interview/jeczaja Amazon Author page: http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B00IU4RWKE

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