history, Human Nature, politics

Gun Control and Auschwitz: It’s Really Hard to Shoot Lice

Boers had guns.

Boers had guns.

On Twitter this morning, a man posted, “I’d rather die defending gun rights than be part of the after effects of gun control,” accompanied by a picture from WWII concentration camps of starved corpses. Message being, if they take our guns, this is how we will all end up.

I have no problem with supporting amendments, including the 2nd-but how about the 4th? No unreasonable searches and seizures without a warrant? That one is actually being violated as we speak, while no one is coming for your guns, though I notice Alex Jones often works himself up to that assertion by the end of his programs. “They’re coming for your guns!” Hide your dang guns, then.

I have no problem with gun ownership, per se, but I do notice some really insane assertions from NRA-types that make me feel embarrassed on their behalf.  They are so scared, they aren’t thinking straight.

The starved corpse pictures from German concentration camps are almost all victims of typhus, a nasty disease of wartime and crowded conditions. Anne Frank died of typhus and Viktor Frankl’s classic, “Man’s Search for Meaning” talks a lot about typhus as a killer in the camps. As a doctor/inmate, he worked in the camp infirmary. One of the effects of typhus, which is transmitted by lice, is starvation-even if food is available.

The English came up with concentration camps during the Boer Wars in the late 1800s. Tens of thousands of mostly Boer women and children died, mostly from typhus. When the folks back home found out about this, they began to lose their appetitie for empire.

Where were the Boer men? Out fighting the English.

With guns.

Perhaps we don’t want to think that a disease is more deadly than combat, even though more died from the Spanish flu following WWI then died  in combat during that horrible conflict.

Maybe we don’t like to think about that because it’s really hard to shoot lice.

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About Je' Czaja

Je' is a writer, artist, and stand up philosopher. She founded and directed two non-profit organizations for disadvantaged children and their families, served as a missionary for three years and is the author of several books. https://www.smashwords.com/interview/jeczaja Amazon Author page: http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B00IU4RWKE

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